Volitional+と
  • Plain form volitional followed by と.

    Example:上がろうと and 動かそうと

    What exactly does this combination make? I've been running into this form everywhere, and I don't know what to make of it.

    I've also seen Plain form + と.

    Something similar?
  • It really depends on the context. Here are some possibilities:

    「動かそう」と言いました。 I said “Let’s move it”.
    動かそうと思う。 I want to move it / I'm thinking of moving it.
    動かそうとする。 I try to move it.

    With the plain form, it could mean if/when, e.g.

    ウェッブサイトを見ると電話番号があります。 If you look at the website, the phone number is there.
    立つと目が舞う。 I feel dizzy when I stand up.
  • Personally, I like to think of と being part of the following part of the sentence instead of the verb. Like roro said, it depends on what comes after what it actually means. と思う means to think of something, the verb you put in front of it is simply what you're thinking of. Granted, using volitional form is a tiny bit special since 動かそう means let's move it, so 動かそうと思う would mean "i think let's move it", but it's kinda simple to see how it can mean "I'm thinking of moving it".

    The point is really that "volitional + to" isn't actually any special construction or grammar, it's just that you in some to + verb sentences use volitional form.
  • Hmmm. Well I already knew about using it as a quotation mark and the "try to"... but when I encountered it, there wasn't a "言う", "する", or "思う" following it. It seemed to be forming a dependent clause... so it probably does mean along the lines of "if/when". I wasn't sure though, and the use of the volitional confused me.

    Thank-you!
  • Posted By: dreamingfifi
    [p]Hmmm. Well I already knew about using it as a quotation mark and the "try to"... but when I encountered it, there wasn't a "言う", "する", or "思う" following it. It seemed to be forming a dependent clause... so it probably does mean along the lines of "if/when". I wasn't sure though, and the use of the volitional confused me.[/p][p]Thank-you![/p]

    If you can find that example again, I'd love to see it. If a sentence ends with to... it generally implies there's an unspoken sentence following it which the speaking person decided was not needed because the context was clear. I just can't really think of any situation where that would be used with a volitional verb, I hardly think it's impossible though. Remember, there's also the っと "phrase" which is used commonly by girls. From what I've gathered, it's basically just a variation of って and is used in situations like.... ちょっとテレビを見ようっと. I'm pretty sure it's often used with volitional verbs, I know for a fact it's used in one of the upper intermediate podcasts of japanesepod101.com

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