help with future speaking test
  • Hey all I'm making a guide to study off for a soon upcoming speaking test I have where I have to stand infront of the class with a paper on the overhead showing some stuff in English, and talk about it in Japanese.

    I go to (Dayton) because (my family lives/is there).
    Home: (1:00) Duration (1 hour 30 minutes) Destination: Dayton (2:30)
    Home to Bus, Bus to bus-terminal. Bus-terminal to Parking Lot. (Car)
    Walk:1. 2. 3.

    Thats basically the English part we have to do, but I don't have the walking parts we need yet but everything else at the moment. Here's how I've translated everything so far.. also I have a bit of a limited vocabulary because we can only use what we've learned in our class book.

    あそこでかぞくいますから、DAYTONに行きます。
    わたしのうちからばすにのって、ばすのりばでおります。
    それからくるまにのって、ちゅうしゃじょうでおります。
    わたしは一時にうちおでて、二時はんにDAYTONにつきます。
    一時かんはんかかります。

    Sorry if it's absolutely terrible. Thanks in advance for any help.
  • What you wrote is good.

    I suggest changing the word order of the first sentence, as follows. I also added "ha" (pronounced "wa") and changed "de" to "ni".
    かぞくはDaytonにいますから、あそこに行きます。
    If you have learnt "sunde imasu" (using the verb "sumu", to live) in class, you could use that in place of "imasu".

    I replaced "uchi" with "ie" (same kanji, different reading), although "uchi" will do if you haven't learnt "ie" yet.
    I wrote "basu" in katakana, if it's okay for you to use that (I know this is an oral exercise, but you might need to show your paper to the teacher).
    I also replaced "basu ni notte" (get on the bus) with "basu de itte" (go by bus), which sounds better with "(place) kara".
    いえからバスで行って、バスのりばでおります。
    それからくるまにのって、ちゅうしゃじょうでおります。

    Again, I replaced "uchi" with "ie". Also, I replaced "o" with the object particle "wo" (pronounced "o").
    一時にいえをでて、二時はんにDaytonにつきます。

    No changes here.
    一時かんはんかかります。
  • I don't know how much advice I can give since you say you're only allowed to use the vocabulary used in class. here's my version of your japanese text:

    DAYTONに通っています、家族がそこに住んでいるからです。
    家を1時に出って、バスに乗って、バス乗り場で降ります。
    降りた後は車に乗って、駐車場まで行きます。
    2時半にDAYTONへ着きますので、全部で2時間半ぐらいかかります。

    I am assuming Dayton is some form of school.
  • I think Dayton's probably the name of a town, though I have to admit to being a little confused with who you mean by family and what you mean by home. I guess English can be ambiguous too. Also, does someone pick you up at the bus terminal, or do you drive? Either way 'oriru' sounds a bit strange to me when used with a car rather than public transport.
  • I guessed it was a school since he said "I go to Dayton", not "I'm going to dayton" or "When I go home to my parents" or something like that. It seems like a general statement.
  • Thanks for the great help everyone. Dayton is a city, also the little "story" is half true half not because we had a set guideline for what we had to put in it so I had to put some fake parts in it, which is allowed. Our vocabulary and grammar is kind of limited so I can't really use some things that I want to. I kind of wanted a simple (because I don't have enough time in the presentation to say too much details) version of;
    "I go to(travel to) Dayton often because my family lives there, it takes about an hour to an hour and a half to get there and I travel the whole way by car." (true story)
    Something like that is what it kind of originally was, and then we got specific guidelines where we have to include 2 forms of transportation and one has to be by bus, then you walk some portion (which I'm working on doing that part). But yeah the bus to car part doesn't really make much sense for the real world, but it's how we have to do it. :P

    Thanks,
    Emily
  • Posted By: emily00
    [p]Thanks for the great help everyone. Dayton is a city, also the little "story" is half true half not because we had a set guideline for what we had to put in it so I had to put some fake parts in it, which is allowed. Our vocabulary and grammar is kind of limited so I can't really use some things that I want to. I kind of wanted a simple (because I don't have enough time in the presentation to say too much details) version of;
    "I go to(travel to) Dayton often because my family lives there, it takes about an hour to an hour and a half to get there and I travel the whole way by car." (true story)
    Something like that is what it kind of originally was, and then we got specific guidelines where we have to include 2 forms of transportation and one has to be by bus, then you walk some portion (which I'm working on doing that part). But yeah the bus to car part doesn't really make much sense for the real world, but it's how we have to do it. :P[/p][p]Thanks,
    Emily[/p]

    Well, my first part doesn't work then, kayotte iru is only for school. The rest should be useable however.
  • Heres the walking part I came up with that I had a lot more trouble with and I think I messed up extremely bad..
    1. Turn right at the traffic light.
    2. Go straight past 2 intersections.
    3. Family’s house is ahead of restaurant.

    1. しんごうをみぎにまがって、ふたつめまっすぐいきます。
    3. レストランのさきでかぞくのうちあります。
    (obviously putting 1 and 2 together, might separate it later though)
  • I think some people are maybe bringing the level too high by trying to use exactly the right word or phrase, and forgetting that it's supposed to be simple. That's why in my response I tried not to change too much, to explain my suggested changes, and not to put loads of kanji that weren't in the original. That said, I'm going to bring the level up a bit in my answer to these questions - but I will offer a more simple alternative as well.

    I would probably say:

    1. しんごうをみぎにまがって、まっすぐ行って、こうさをふたつとおりすぎます。
    You may not have learnt 交差 (kousa - intersection) and 通り過ぎる (toorisugiru - go past/through) though, so maybe:

    しんごうをみぎにまがって、ふたつめまでまっすぐ行きます。
    I would prefer to use another noun with “futatsu”, but I guess it makes sense if you take it as referring back to "shingou" (which is not the same as "intersection", but close).

    3. かぞくのいえ [or うち] はレストランのまえです。
    I wouldn't use "saki", as I think that's better used for "before" in time rather than location.
  • Another way to say the first part
    しんごうをみぎにまがって、まっすぐ行って、二つのしんごうを渡ると、かぞくのいえはレストランのまえにあります。

    When Japanese describe directions, they commonly use the to particle as I have done above. If you have not learned it yet, wataru (渡る) means to cross and is used both for crossing the road and crossing intersections.

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

In this Discussion