Help with Japanese
  • Hello! I was just wondering if it makes sense to say,

    Boushi wo kabutteiru kute boushi ga akai desu.

    I'm trying to say: [Mario is wearing] a hat and the hat is red.
    I've already mentioned Mario earlier, so it doesn't matter if I don't mention him again, right?

    Thank you for your help. :3
  • If the context is clear there is no need to refer to Mario again, no.

    I am also quite certain that the second boushi can also be avoided.
  • Just verified with a dear friend of mine, she would say:

    boushi wo kabutteite, sore ha akai desu.
  • I guess you don't want to say 'Akai boushi wo kabutteiru'?

    Anyhow, that 'kute' in the middle isn't correct. You only use 'kute' with 'i' adjectives (eg 'boushi ha akakute suteki desu) or negative forms of verbs (shinakute ii desu ka?) - negative forms of verbs operate very much like 'i' adjectives.

    To connect 'kabutteiru' you could make it 'kabutteite', but you'd have to say 'boushi' twice to signal you're changing the subject from Mario to the hat.

    You can say (boushi wo kabutteite, sono boushi ga akai desu). Hope it's helpful.
  • I didn't see Asmodai's second comment. OK, I can see you don't have to say 'boushi' twice.
  • hi. i'd like to know what 'dekiteitara' means and how different is it with 'dekitenakattara'

    thanks.
  • [quote]
    Posted By: Richard
    [p]I guess you don't want to say 'Akai boushi wo kabutteiru'?[/p][p]Anyhow, that 'kute' in the middle isn't correct. You only use 'kute' with 'i' adjectives (eg 'boushi ha akakute suteki desu) or negative forms of verbs (shinakute ii desu ka?) - negative forms of verbs operate very much like 'i' adjectives.[/p][p]

    I will second that, and expand on it. The volitional form of verbs (e.g. ikitai - want to go) functions in the same way.
  • Posted By: gakusei
    [p]hi. i'd like to know what 'dekiteitara' means and how different is it with 'dekitenakattara'[/p][p]thanks.[/p]


    ~ている usually means to be doing something, or to have done something.

    Depending on the context, I would probably translate できていたら (dekite itara) as "If you have finished", and できていなかったら (dekite inakattara) or the less formal できてなかったら (dekite nakattara) as "If you haven't finished."
  • I think so, although since you're rating a person's performance rather than speaking directly to that person, it might be better to just say "If finished" and "If not finished".

    In any case, I would keep the meaning of "finish" rather than "can" for dekiru, because of the "~te iru".

    When marking a student's work in Japan, a circle (maru) means correct and an X (batsu) or triangle means incorrect.
  • Posted By: roro
    [quote]
    Posted By: gakusei
    [p]hi. i'd like to know what 'dekiteitara' means and how different is it with 'dekitenakattara'[/p][p]thanks.[/p]
    [p]~ている usually means to be doing something, or to have done something.[/p][p]Depending on the context, I would probably translate できていたら (dekite itara) as "If you have finished", and できていなかったら (dekite inakattara) or the less formal できてなかったら (dekite nakattara) as "If you haven't finished."[/p][/quote]
    I second this with a slight correction.

    ~ている always means being in the process of doing something (for transitive verbs) or being in the process of BEING (for intransitive verbs).

    Examples:
    私がやっている - I'm being in the process of doing "it". (I'm doing "it".)
    窓が開いている - The window is in the process of BEING open. (The window is open)

    ~ていた on the other hand, means something having been done and finished. 食べていた thus means "I have been eating (but I'm not doing it anymore)."
  • Posted By: roro
    [p]When marking a student's work in Japan, a circle (maru) means correct and an X (batsu) or triangle means incorrect.[/p]

    Unless, of course, ◎ (にじゅうまる - very good) and △ (さんかく - average/weak) are used as well next to ◯ (good) and × (wrong)... Got to love the different styles.
  • [cite]Posted By: Tobberoth
    ~ている always means being in the process of doing something (for transitive verbs) or being in the process of BEING (for intransitive verbs).[/p][p]Examples:
    私がやっている - I'm being in the process of doing "it". (I'm doing "it".)
    窓が開いている - The window is in the process of BEING open. (The window is open)[/p][p]~ていた on the other hand, means something having been done and finished. 食べていた thus means "I have been eating (but I'm not doing it anymore)."[/p]


    You're right. In this context, 出来ている and 出来てない seem to refer to the work (It is / is not finished) rather than to the student (He has / has not finished), so it is similar to 窓が開いている.

    However, I don't agree completely with "being in the process of", because that implies the possibility of change.

    If something is already finished, that's permanent - it's not going to stop being finished.

    I would say that "verb +ている" refers not to a process but to a state (which may or may not have the potential to change).
  • I accidentally quoted my own post instead of editing it, and now I can't delete this "reply" - Kim, maybe you could introduce that as an option?
  • Posted By: roro
    [quote]
    Posted By: Tobberoth
    ~ている always means being in the process of doing something (for transitive verbs) or being in the process of BEING (for intransitive verbs).[/p]
    [p]Examples:
    私がやっている - I'm being in the process of doing "it". (I'm doing "it".)
    窓が開いている - The window is in the process of BEING open. (The window is open)[/p][p]~ていた on the other hand, means something having been done and finished. 食べていた thus means "I have been eating (but I'm not doing it anymore)."[/p]
    [p]You're right. In this context, 出来ている and 出来てない seem to refer to the work (It is / is not finished) rather than to the student (He has / has not finished), so it is similar to 窓が開いている.[/p][p]However, I don't agree completely with "being in the process of", because that implies the possibility of change.[/p][p]If something is already finished, that's permanent - it's not going to stop being finished.[/p][p]I would say that "verb +ている" refers not to a process but to a state (which may or may not have the potential to change).[/p][/quote]

    Not really true, there's nothing in ~ている saying that something can't change. Sure, in this very example, dekiteiru isn't something you expect to change, but it COULD change. For example, you might have finished homework, but it turns out the homework was extended. Suddenly, it isn't finished anymore. (The whole idea that there is such a thing as -te ita proves this, dekite ita means it was finished (but isn't finished anymore) ).

    I do agree that -te iru is better explained as a state instead of process though.
  • I would say that "verb +ている" refers not to a process but to a state (which may or may not have the potential to change).
    Not really true, there's nothing in ~ている saying that something can't change.
    -----
    Sorry, I made my comment sound general, when I intended it to be specific to that one case.
    ----------
  • I like the triangle (△). Although the way I learnt it was that it meant something like 'not quite right'. And when I was an English teacher in Japan, and my students said something a bit odd, and I said, 'Well, it's not wrong, it's just triangle.' they seemed to understand where I was coming from.
  • Posted By: Richard
    [p]I like the triangle (△). Although the way I learnt it was that it meant something like 'not quite right'. And when I was an English teacher in Japan, and my students said something a bit odd, and I said, 'Well, it's not wrong, it's just triangle.' they seemed to understand where I was coming from.[/p]

    Yeah, it's the same in my experience. On our tests in japanese, if a question was worth 2 points, a O was 2 points, a triangle was worth 1. I always guessed it was supposed to be a "deformed" circle, meaning it's almost right.
  • Well, you learn something new every day - I thought triangle was just a variation of X. Nice to know that it's actually a deformed circle ;) Good system.
  • Posted By: roro
    [p]I accidentally quoted my own post instead of editing it, and now I can't delete this "reply" - Kim, maybe you could introduce that as an option?[/p]


    I'm not sure the forum software has that as an option unfortunately.

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