kochira koso
  • Can "kochira koso" be used to mean "I should ask you the same thing?" The dictionary said it means "it is I who should say so," but can that be extended to questions as well? Or is there another way to say that?
  • こちら means I, me or we. こそ simply implies emphasis. So literally, こちらこそ means ME instead of simply me. The definition from the dictionary thus makes sense, such as in:
    あいがとうございます! - Thank you!
    いいえ、こちらこそ。 - No, I'M (the one who should say that).

    In the same way, if someone asks you something and you want to imply that it's not him, it's YOU who should ask, then こちらこそ works in just the same way.
  • Okay, I was hoping that was the case. Thank you very much! Can it be used at any level of formality?
  • こそ can be used at any level of formality or politeness. こちら however is quite polite. In a casual situation, 私こそ or 僕こそ etc should work.
  • Ah, thank you!
  • 'Kochira koso' is used all the time, but the others are not so common. Perhaps 'betsu ni' is the most common way to reply to 'arigato' in casual conversation, or just 'iie'.
  • Posted By: Richard
    [p]'Kochira koso' is used all the time, but the others are not so common. Perhaps 'betsu ni' is the most common way to reply to 'arigato' in casual conversation, or just 'iie'.[/p]

    Indeed, but that's not really the same meaning. If someone thanks you and you want to say that it wasn't a big deal, you can use 別に or いいえ, but it doesn't work if you actually mean that you're the one who should be thankful.
  • I always felt it had the same meaning as 'same here', as in I I was grateful/thankful as well. That was more from how/when it was used than ever looking it up. Good to know there's a difference. I've always been trying to pick when to use different responses for situations. One I've started using more is とんでもない, so throwing that in the mix, what kind of situations would you use each one? Which would be for more formal and which for more casual?
  • こちらこそ!=me too!
    とんでもない=not at all !
    depends on you what do you wanna say!
  • Posted By: Tobberoth
    [quote]
    Posted By: Richard
    [p]'Kochira koso' is used all the time, but the others are not so common. Perhaps 'betsu ni' is the most common way to reply to 'arigato' in casual conversation, or just 'iie'.[/p]
    [p]Indeed, but that's not really the same meaning. If someone thanks you and you want to say that it wasn't a big deal, you can use 別に or いいえ, but it doesn't work if you actually mean that you're the one who should be thankful.[/p][/quote]

    I can see your point, and I'm not saying I'm the ultimate expert, but I think that 'boku koso' particularly is not actually used, or almost never used by Japanese people while 'kochira koso' is an extremely common and useful phrase.

    If you put 'boku koso' and 'arigato' into Google you get about five thousand hits, while 'kochira koso' and 'arigato' get about three million hits. Then even on the first page for 'boku koso' and 'arigato' most of the contexts for 'boku koso' are not connected with thanking.

    Well, Google is not the ultimate oracle either, but lining it up with my personal experience (I can't remember ever hearing 'boku koso' used as a reply to 'arigato') I'd need some evidence to change my opinion.

    To me 'boku koso' (as a reply to arigato) sounds like a mixture of casual and formal speech.
  • if i can say... 私の知る限りから”僕こそ”でも 丁寧な言葉です!よく会話に出ます!
  • Posted By: Richard
    [quote]
    Posted By: Tobberoth
    [quote]
    Posted By: Richard
    [p]'Kochira koso' is used all the time, but the others are not so common. Perhaps 'betsu ni' is the most common way to reply to 'arigato' in casual conversation, or just 'iie'.[/p]
    [p]Indeed, but that's not really the same meaning. If someone thanks you and you want to say that it wasn't a big deal, you can use 別に or いいえ, but it doesn't work if you actually mean that you're the one who should be thankful.[/p][/quote][p]I can see your point, and I'm not saying I'm the ultimate expert, but I think that 'boku koso' particularly is not actually used, or almost never used by Japanese people while 'kochira koso' is an extremely common and useful phrase.[/p][p]If you put 'boku koso' and 'arigato' into Google you get about five thousand hits, while 'kochira koso' and 'arigato' get about three million hits. Then even on the first page for 'boku koso' and 'arigato' most of the contexts for 'boku koso' are not connected with thanking.[/p][p]Well, Google is not the ultimate oracle either, but lining it up with my personal experience (I can't remember ever hearing 'boku koso' used as a reply to 'arigato') I'd need some evidence to change my opinion.[/p][p]To me 'boku koso' (as a reply to arigato) sounds like a mixture of casual and formal speech.[/p][/quote]
    boku koso is used constantly, 僕こそ gives over 8 million hits on google. As for being used directly as an answer to arigato, I agree that it's almost never used, but that can't be because of its actual meaning. In all probability, it's because kochira koso is a set phrase. Just like in English, you could say "nah, I'm the one who should be thanking you" but you don't because there are tons of set phrases which come to mind first, such as "no problem" and "any time.". I wasn't implying that people should use 僕こそ when someone thanks them, rather I was demonstrating the grammatical meaning of こそ. From a grammatical standpoint, there's no difference between こちらこそ and 僕こそ except for politeness.
  • If you just type in 僕こそ to Google you will get 8 million hits, but most of them will simply have 僕 somewhere and こそ somewhere else. If you search for the phrase by using quotation marks "僕こそ", then it appears 12 thousand times. But anyway, I should have made it clearer that I meant 僕こそ is almost never used as a reply to arigato. My bad.
  • i think, with a solid grammatical understanding, a learner of Japanese will do all right just focusing on how the set phrases are used, because the original phrases can just be pieced together on the spot. since "boku koso" isn't used as a set phrase, it's a bit irrelevant to discuss it to this degree. but good points, nevertheless...
  • Kochiro often would be used in introductions to say kochiro wa suzuki ichiroo san no toyota desu. for example it would mean something like: This here is Ichiroo suzuki from Toyota cormpany. So when you use it in the sense described above I would think for example, it would be similar, but not literally "I", more like also here I am pleased to meet you and may I be in your favor, particularly to a superior. For example Kochira koso douzo yoroshiku onegaishimasu.
  • Another way to think of it is by using other examples. Kochira wa (This is) Sochira wa (that is) achira wa (That over there is). Similar to kore wa enpitsu, sore wa pen, are wa kuruma. This is a pencil. That is a pen, and that over there is a car. Or Kone wa sumisu san. This is smiths, Sone wa (That is) ichiroo's, Kono wa sumisu san, sono wa joansan, ano wa tomsan. This is smiths, THat is Joan's and that over there is toms. This is... what is this... Kore wa nan desu ka... This is johns car. Sono wa Johnsan no kora (Coke) desu. (3 examples of the 3 types) that might help a bit I hope. my suggestions is trying to be too literal in translation in my opinion. Often there isn't a literal translation which makes sense.

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