[English to Japanese] Would you please help me?
  • Hey guys, would you please mind helping me out with this short text? I need to translate it in order to send it as soon as possible.

    The thing is, I need to send an email to a japanese company, asking them wether it's possible for me to use one of the fonts they've designed (it's a designing company) in order to apply it to the things I sell.

    Here's it:

    "Thank you very much for your response, it's very kind of you. As far as it goes, so far, I'm only planning on making t-shirts and hoodies. I won't be selling any sport's related articles any time soon. . I've attached one of shirt's picture above. I'd love, if possible, to use this font of yours on some of these clothes. (Please see attached file).

    Thank you once again for your attention, looking forward to hear from you soon.

    Best regards"


    And there you go, that's it!

    Thank you for taking the time to read this, I appreciate it much.
    Take care
  • Hey Frankeely,

    I saw your other post and assumed this was a response to that mail, so I've taken the liberty of adding the company name and your contact's name to the text.

    also, I'm no native so it might not be perfect, but anyway:

    -start -

    DIGITALDREAMDESIGN
    イトウ様

    お世話になっております。
    丁寧なご返答を頂き、有難うございました。

    下記の件ですが、実はT-シャツと洋服を作る予定でございますが、販売するつもりは今の時点ではございません。
    T-シャツのサンプルの写真を添付いたしましたので、ご覧下さい。
    もし可能でございましたら、是非、貴社のフォントを利用させて頂きたいと存じます。

    お忙しい中、恐れ入りますが、ご検討の程、何卒よろしくお願いいたします。

    [your name etc.]

    -end-

    I've changed some bits to make it a little bit more formal (after all, you've never met this guy, right?)

    here a small line by line translation:

    DIGITALDREAMDESIGN
    イトウ様 - Mr. Itou

    お世話になっております。 - Dear sir,
    丁寧なご返答を頂き、有難うございました。 - Thank you for your kind response

    下記の件ですが、実はT-シャツと洋服を作る予定でございますが、販売するつもりは今の時点ではございません。 - Actually, I am planning on making t-shirts and other clothing, but at this time, do not have any plans to sell them.
    T-シャツのサンプルの写真を添付いたしましたので、ご覧下さい。
    - I have added a picture of a sample-T-shirt, please check it out.
    もし可能でございましたら、是非、貴社のフォントを利用させて頂きたいと存じます。
    - If possible I would very much like to make use of your company's font.

    お忙しい中、恐れ入りますが、ご検討の程、何卒よろしくお願いいたします。
    - Hoping you will consider, many thanks, yours sincerely,

    -end-

    If you have any questions or want to change anything, go ahead and post it.

    Also, if anyone else feels I've made mistakes (I'm sure there are some), please feel free to comment.



  • I would hold off and wait for a little more discussion in this thread before sending an answer.
  • I am using similarly polite language that Itou used when speaking to you to play it safe.

    I'm fairly certain the "power" is more on your end in terms of language use as they are still a company and you a prospective client, even though they had to turn down your first request. I'm using same-level speech though as Itou, which was originally fairly deferential and humble (as is normal for a customer service representative).


    Itou-sama
    Itousama、
    イトウ様、 

    Thank you very much for your response, it's very kind of you.
    o henji wo itadakimashite, hontou ni arigatou gozaimasu.
    お返事をいただきまして、 本当にありがとうございます。
    (Thank you very much for your reply)

    As far as it goes, so far, I'm only planning on making t-shirts and hoodies.
    ima no tokoro, mazu t-shyatsu to paakaa wo tsukuru yotei desu.
    今のところ、まず t-シャツやパーカーを作る予定です。 
    (right now, first of all, t-shirts and hoodies I plan to make)

    I won't be selling any sport's related articles any time soon.
    スポーツブランド shouhin wa mada saki no koto desu.
    スポーツブランド商品はまだ先のことです。
    (Sports Brand good are still a bit for the future)

    I've attached one of shirt's picture above.
    一つのt-シャツの写真を添付ファイルで付属しました。
    (a picture of one of the t-shirts I have included as an attached file.)

    I'd love, if possible, to use this font of yours on some of these clothes. (Please see attached file).
    できれば、 DIGITALDREAMDESIGN のフォントをぜひ利用許可をお願いいたします。 
    (If possible, DDD's font, I would very much like permission to make use of)

    Thank you once again for your attention, looking forward to hear from you soon.
    改めてこの件で、 ご注目をありがとうございます。
    (once again, in this matter, thank you for your attention)

    Best regards"
    よろしくお願いいたします。
    (thank you very much.)

    お返事をいただきまして、 本当にありがとうございます。 今のところ、まず t-シャツやパーカーを作る予定です。  スポーツブランド商品はまだ先のことです。 一つのt-シャツの写真を添付ファイルで付属しました。 できれば、 DIGITALDREAMDESIGN のフォントをぜひ利用許可をお願いいたします。 改めてこの件で、 ご注目をありがとうございます。

    よろしくお願いいたします。


    I wish I could be somewhat more helpful here, but I think this will present the bare bones of what you say. However, you did not explain what exactly the picture is of so I said it was a T-shirt, if that's not what it is I will change the word.

    Also, you did not seem to address his point of whether you would be willing to give items in trade for the usage fee or if that is a deal breaker for you.
  • IDen, forgive me if this is not constructive to you, but I believe in some ways your response is much too polite, in the sense that it may make it harder to read. I think it is probably best to match the level of humbleness and kanji usage employed by the other speaker if you are not in the "subservient" position. In the case of the version you posted, you use kanji for the same words Itou wrote in kana most times.

    I am not criticizing I am trying to help. I understand what you are trying to say certainly, based on the situation.

    It is easier for me to read and understand Japanese than to write it -- again I have little experience writing actual business correspondence and only studied it a bit in class -- but this is how I translate your version IDen *as it currently reads,* literally then for meaning:

    イトウ様
    Mr. Itou

    お世話になっております。
    (I am in your care/you are too kind)

    丁寧なご返答を頂き、有難うございました。
    your polite response I received gratefully
    (Thank you very much for your similarly polite response)

    下記の件ですが、実はT-シャツと洋服を作る予定でございますが、販売するつもりは今の時点ではございません。
    In the following matter, in truth, t-shirts and western clothing I plan to honorably make but, as for selling intentions, right now at this point it is not.
    (In the following way, in truth T-shirts and western clothing is what I plan to make, but I am *NOT* selling them right now.)

    T-シャツのサンプルの写真を添付いたしましたので、ご覧下さい。
    もし可能でございましたら、是非、貴社のフォントを利用させて頂きたいと存じます。
    T-shirts' sample's picture I have previously attached and so, please look.
    If, if honorably possible by chance, please, your company's font I would honorably like to use knowingly.
    (The picture of the t-shirt's sample was attached; please take a look. If it is/was a possibility, by all means, your company's font please let me use and know.)

    お忙しい中、恐れ入りますが、ご検討の程、何卒よろしくお願いいたします。
    During your busy-ness, sorry to impose but, to the extent of your honorable considerations, by all means, please take care.
    (While you are very busy, sorry to bother you but, to the extent that you can consider it, please please take care.)


    So unfortunately, it is a bit confusing for me to read this version and I think it would be for Itou as well. There is a bit too much humbleness and it feels forced, and a bit of past-tense usage being applied for the present.


    It is for my own hesitation in writing business correspondence that I was hoping there may be some more input from other users in this thread.
  • Kouk, please do not apologize. Criticism is always welcome.

    To be honest though, I disagree with some of your criticism. I don't think it's all that difficult to understand (even if I use kanji instead of kana in some situations).
    Also, I've actually never heard of matching the level of kanji-usage. Most e-mail correspondence I've had doesn't point to it either.

    About the level of politeness, as you're asking him for a favour (you want to be use his company's font without paying the fee), I feel a certain level of politeness is required in this situation. Most of the sentences I used (e.g. "お世話になっております" and " 何卒よろしくお願いいたします") are standard business-correspondence sentences.

    Also, you did mistranslate some parts of my e-mail. If you're curious as to what parts, let me know.
  • I actually agree with IDen and I'd choose his version.
  • Oh definitely I want to hear. As I said in other posts (thought I did here too, guess not) I don't have experience with correspondence. I come here to learn and refresh.

    I was taught "when in doubt be polite" but also that I shouldn't try to out-polite the other person unless they were clearly "superior." Based on maintaining social status-quo for the situation.

    So that, if you go into a store and the clerk is a certain level of politeness to you, you probably should not be so deferential as to be super-duper polite in response since they are supposed to be "subservient" in that position and they would feel compelled to match or exceed you in politeness. If one uses much more kanji than another about the same issue, it is like saying you are more learned than they, kind of, or like correcting them. I've heard it from several different teachers (I made it a habit to ask the same questions to different people) and also readings assigned about Japanese culture. 4 teachers is not quite representative of course of the 130,000,000!

    My teachers over the years were all native Japanese, but honestly they did not seem involved much in business and mostly taught on conversational levels. Besides for my Japanese Business course teacher, but his class focused more on macroeconomic and social issues and corporate structure than having us write much "correspondence," as it was ostensibly an English-language course for business majors (though he encouraged us to write papers in Japanese if we could).

    But if that's normal for business writings, then it is good for me to know!

    What parts did I mistranslate?
  • Also, in Itou's original reply, he/she said

    大変ご丁寧な日本語でメールをいただきましてありがとうございます.

    Which I interpreted as he was making a comment that excessive politeness, from his standpoint, was sent in originally by the original poster. But if that is also a normal set-phrase used, that would be good to know too.
  • Kouk,

    Ok. Here we go:

    下記の件ですが、実はT-シャツと洋服を作る予定でございますが、販売するつもりは今の時点ではございません。
    (In the following way, in truth T-shirts and western clothing is what I plan to make, but I am *NOT* selling them right now.)

    下記の件ですが、
    It's not 'in the following way', but (literally-ish): "Regarding the matter below,".
    The way I've learned is, it's a sort of general starting sentence for e-mails, which would translate into something like: "regarding to your question..."

    Also,
    販売するつもりは今の時点ではございません。
    but I am *NOT* selling them right now.
    "販売するつもり" means: "having the intention to sell" and "今の時点では" means "at this time".
    So the sentence says: "I have no intention of selling (these) at this time".

    もし可能でございましたら、是非、貴社のフォントを利用させて頂きたいと存じます。
    If it is/was a possibility, by all means, your company's font please let me use and know.)
    もし可能でございましたら、
    This is past tense because of the conditional "if..." - " ~ら" construction.
    Using ございましたら is the same as だったら, only more polite.

    Also,
    是非、貴社のフォントを利用させて頂きたいと存じます。
    by all means, your company's font please let me use and know
    存じます means 思う ('think'), not 'know' in this case.
    So it translates as:
    "(by all means), I'd like to be allowed to use your company's font"


    お忙しい中、恐れ入りますが、ご検討の程、何卒よろしくお願いいたします。
    (While you are very busy, sorry to bother you but, to the extent that you can consider it, please please take care.)
    This is also standard-business mail practice: always end with よろしくお願いします.
    Also, I choose to apologize for making use of his time ("お忙しい中、恐れ入りますが、"). Not necessary but I've been taught to do it.

    "~のほど、よろしくお願いします。" means something like
    "please take care of ..."
    in this case I say "検討のほど..." so that would make:
    "please consider (my offer)."


    Regarding your other comment:

    大変ご丁寧な日本語でメールをいただきましてありがとうございます
    means, roughly speaking:
    "thank you for your e-mail. Your Japanese is excellent."

    It's not that he's saying anything about your level of politeness, but is praising your Japanese skill (instead of saying '上手な日本語', he says 丁寧な日本語, which is about the same).
    Thanking someone for their e-mail is also standard practice, yes.


    If you have any questions about the above, let me know.

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